Tag Archives: Appliance Science
Appliance Science: How Surge Protectors Keep You Safe

Just published at CNET, How Surge Protectors Keep You Safe.

SurgeProtector_web_EDITYour appliances and gadgets love electricity. It’s the stuff that brings them to life, but too much can be a bad thing. If the voltage of the electricity coming in over your wires suddenly rises, that can damage them. Electrical engineers call this kind of problem a transient voltage surge, because it comes and goes quickly. This can happen when something like a transformer blowout or a faulty appliance sends a sudden spike of energy into your home wiring. This is why many people use a surge protector to block these surges.

Appliance Science: The Hot Physics of Induction Cooking

My latest Appliance Science column at CNET explains how induction cooktops work, heating your dinner without direct heat. Plus a special section onĀ frog levitation.

ApplianceScience_Induction (1)Induction cooktops are also more efficient than other types of cooking methods. Because the heat is generated inside the base of the pan, they use less electricity than conventional electric cooktops, and can heat things quicker. They are also easier to clean, because the flat glass or ceramic surface has no gaps or grills to collect spilled food, and the food doesn’t get burned onto the surface. If you spill something, one quick swipe with a damp cloth will clean it up.